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There is an 80 percent chance Assange will be extradited to the United States to face espionage charges. WikiLeaks founder claims aggressive US inquiry.
By Admin (from 18/12/2010 @ 16:58:22, in en - Global Observatory, read 1492 times)

WikiLeaker Julian Assange celebrated his first day out on bail yesterday by vowing to keep spilling secrets like a sieve -- including insider information on banks around the world.

Assange also estimated there is an "80 percent" chance he'll be extradited to the United States to face espionage charges.

The Internet tattler, who is staying in a 10-bedroom mansion under house arrest for the next two months, boasted that he was ready to dump tens of thousands of additional documents that could "take down a bank or two."

"We have been attacked, primarily not by government . . . although things are heating up now, but by banks," he said.

"Banks from Dubai, banks from Switzerland, banks from the US, banks from the UK, so, yes of course, we are continuing to release material about banks," he told CNBC.

Assange, who yesterday said the media attention he has been getting made him "feel like Paris Hilton," earlier hinted that Bank of America would be a target.

While Assange believes he will be indicted in the United States, he insisted he couldn't be convicted of conspiring to steal diplomatic cables because he doesn't know who gave them to his group.

"Our technology means we don't know who is submitting us material," he told Katie Couric on the CBS Evening News.

Assange is charged with sexual assault in Sweden. He claims Swedish investigators have evidence that would exonerate him of charges he sexually attacked two women.

Source: nypost.com

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks to the media outside Ellingham Hall in Norfolk, England, the home of his friend, journalist Vaughan Smith. Photo: Reuters 

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks to the media outside Ellingham Hall in Norfolk, England, the home of his friend, journalist Vaughan Smith. Photo: Reuters

WIKILEAKS founder Julian Assange says he fears the United States is getting ready to indict him, but insists the secret-spilling website will continue its work, despite what he has called a ''dirty tricks campaign''.

Mr Assange spoke on Friday from snowbound Ellingham Hall, a supporter's 10-bedroom country mansion close to the city of Norwich, about three hours' drive from London, where he is confined on bail as he fights Sweden's attempt to extradite him on allegations of rape and molestation.

Mr Assange insisted to television interviewers that he was being subjected to a smear campaign and ''what appears to be a secret grand jury investigation against me or our organisation''.

He has retained the services of an unnamed US law firm.

Mr Assange has repeatedly voiced concerns that American authorities are getting ready to press charges over WikiLeaks's continuing release of about 250,000 secret State Department cables, which have angered and embarrassed US officials worldwide.

US officials are investigating WikiLeaks and considering charges against Mr Assange, a case that, if pursued, could end up pitting the government's efforts to protect sensitive information against press and speech freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment.

A High Court judge freed Mr Assange on bail on Thursday on condition he live at the estate in eastern England, wear an electronic tag and report to police daily.

Mr Assange has described his bail conditions at the 18th-century mansion owned by former British Army officer Vaughan Smith as ''hi-tech house arrest''.

Although Mr Assange promised to focus on clearing his name, he said his first priority was to his work.

''Now that I am back to assist the directing of our ship, our work will proceed in a faster manner,'' he told the BBC.

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald