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10 Reasons Your Body Thinks It's Hungry. Last Part. Find out which situations bring on false food cravings and how to overcome them.
By Admin (from 06/02/2011 @ 08:00:09, in en - Science and Society, read 1667 times)

... CONTINUES.

6. Not enough time has passed since you finished your meal.
You've just eaten lunch only to wonder: "Why am I still hungry?" Before you assume you didn't eat enough, consider that maybe you ate too quickly. "Appetite hormones need time to tell your brain you're full," explains Sandon. To prevent post-meal hunger pangs, keep these pointers in mind: Eat slowly, putting down your fork between bites; choose flavorful and satisfying foods; and include a combination of fat, protein and carbohydrates in every meal. If you're still hungry, try sucking on a mint to ward off your cravings.

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7. The women around you are eating.
A joint study out of Duke University and Arizona State University found that women tend to mirror other women's eating habits. "When one overdoes it, the rest often follow along," Ansel confirms. To avoid this copycat effect, Lippert suggests taking a quick minute to reassess your own eating habits—or, if all else fails, grabbing a pal and evacuating the scene of the food. A more permanent fix? Be the one who sets a healthy example for your girlfriends to follow. Their waistlines will thank you! "Just as obesity is contagious, so are healthy habits," says Dawn Jackson Blatner, author of The Flexitarian Diet.

8. You've been drinking alcohol. 
It's long been suspected that alcohol contributes to an increased appetite. Though the underlying mechanisms are unknown, a common hypothesis is that it makes food more palatable. What we do know is that alcohol decreases our defenses, which is detrimental to those who restrict their eating, explains Jackson Blatner. Furthermore, "People expect that alcohol will make them eat more, which leads them to unabashedly do so," Sandon adds. The solution? Eat before you order that glass of wine, beer or cocktail. To prevent overeating the next day, especially after a night of heavy drinking, be sure to drink plenty of water to replenish your dehydrated body.

9. You smell or see food. 
"We tend to eat with our senses more than our stomachs," says Ansel. When we smell or see food—even if it's in a photo, advertisement or TV show—our mouths water, which stimulates our appetite. Onset factors can include smelling a batch of cupcakes baking, seeing snack food laid out on the counter or watching a cooking show. The clear-cut solution: "Out of sight, out of mind." Leave the room, hide the candy jar, turn off the TV—and the craving to eat will likely subside, says Ansel.

10. You're stressed out. 
"Studies show that when people recognize they're stressed, they are more likely to turn to high-fat, salty or sugary foods," says Sandon. "These foods both are comforting and feel good in the mouth," she adds. But it's not all about emotional eating. Sandon notes that your body's chemical reaction to stress could also cause hunger pangs. "Increased levels of the stress hormones cortisol and insulin may be associated with triggering appetite." Either way, appetite control boils down to decision-making. Before reaching for the ice cream tub, try quickly clearing your mind by completing one of these fifteen 10-second stress-busting techniques.

Source: womansday.com - Author: Brynn Mannino