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We had a chance to sit down with Tom Hadfield from Andrea to talk about how this amazing gadget is able to clean the air in your home 1,000 times better than a normal houseplant.

Andrea was invented by French designer Mathieu Lehanneur and Harvard professor David Edwards as a part of a artistic science experiment in 2007. The purifier, which hit the shelves of stores in North America in January of 2010, is able to amplify the air cleaning ability of a plant with the help of a mechanical fan that moves air past the plant’s leaves, through the soil and roots and out through a water tray that collects toxins.

Andrea can work with many a species of house plants and combines stylish design with proven functionality to not only take away toxins from your home but to also add a sense of style. Andrea’s unique multi-stage, all-natural cleaning system ensures a safe and healthy home for your family. “Today people buy air purifiers and then they go out and they buy a vase,” Tom Hadfield told us. “We think the future of indoor air purification might be somewhere in between those two.”

Source: InHabitat - via: Zeitnews.org

 

Gli esperti di marketing definiscono "redemption" il tasso di risposta del pubblico a un certo stimolo: se per esempio vengono distribuiti 100 buoni sconto per l'acquisto un prodotto a prezzo ridotto e 40 di questi vengono effettivamente utilizzati, la redemption della campagna promozionale è del 40%.
Ebbene, Harold Hackett, un signore canadese appassionato di esperimenti socio culturali, nell'epoca dei social network e dei canali televisivi interattivi è riuscito a dimostrare che lo strumento di comunicazione più efficace è ancora il messaggio nella bottiglia abbandonato tra le onde.

(© foto funtik.cat)

Message in a bottle...
A partire dal maggio del 1996 Hacket ha liberato nelle acque dell'Atlantico oltre 4800 bottiglie di plastica contenenti un messaggio e da allora ha ottenuto ben 3100 risposte da tutto il mondo. Ora ha amici di penna in Africa, Russia, Regno Unito, Scozia, Francia, Bahamas...

E per rendere il suo esperimento assolutamente anologico Hacket non ha inserito nei suoi messaggi nè il suo numero di telefono nè il suo indirizzo e-mail, ma solo quello postale. In questo modo si è assicurato che tutte le risposte gli arrivassero per lettera.

Ogni bottiglia è numerata, così Harold sa a quale dei suoi messaggi si riferisce la risposta: alcune bottiglie sono state in balia delle onde per più di 13 anni prima di essere trovate da qualcuno.

Fonte: focus.it

 

An ambitious University of Nevada, Reno project to understand and characterize geothermal potential at nearly 500 sites throughout the Great Basin is yielding a bounty of information for the geothermal industry to use in developing resources in Nevada, according to a report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

The project, based in the University's Bureau of Mines and Geology in the College of Science, is funded by a $1 million DOE grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. It has reached the one-year mark and is entering phase two, when five or six of the 250 identified potentially viable geothermal sites will be studied in more detail. Some of the studied sites will even have 3-D imaging to help those in the industry better understand geothermal processes and identify where to drill for the hot fluids.

The research aims to provide a catalogue of favorable structural elements, such as the pattern of faulting and models for geothermal systems and site-specific targeting using innovative techniques for fault analysis. The project will enhance exploration methodologies and reduce the risk of drilling nonproductive wells.

Jim Faulds, geologist and research professor at the University of Nevada, Reno's Bureau of Mines and Geology, lectures his geothermal exploration class in April at the Fly Ranch Geyser north of Gerlach, Nev. (Credit: Photo courtesy of the University of Nevada, Reno.)

Jim Faulds, principal investigator for the project, geologist and research professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, has a team of six researchers and several graduate students working with him on various aspects of the project.

"Of the 463 geothermal sites to study, we've studied and characterized more than 250 in the past year, either using existing records or on-site analyses," Faulds said. "We'll continue to study more of the sites so we can develop better methods and tools for geothermal exploration. Most, about two-thirds, of the geothermal resources in the Great Basin are blind -- that is, there are no surface expressions, such as hot springs, to indicate what's perhaps 1,500 feet below the surface."

Better characterization of known geothermal systems is critical for new discoveries, targeting drilling sites and development, Faulds said. The success of modeling sites for exploration is limited without basic knowledge of which fault and fracture patterns, stress conditions, and stratigraphic intervals are most conducive to hosting geothermal reservoirs.

"The geothermal industry doesn't have the same depth of knowledge for geothermal exploration as the mineral and oil industries," he said. "Mineral and oil companies conducted extensive research years ago that helps them to characterize favorable settings and determine where to drill. With geothermal, it's studies like this that will enhance understanding of what controls hot fluids in the Earth's crust and thus provide an exploration basis for industry to use in discovering and developing resources."

Faulds and his team have defined a spectrum of favorable structural settings for geothermal systems in the Great Basin and completed a preliminary catalogue that interprets the structural setting of most its geothermal systems.

"This is the first attempt to broadly characterize and catalogue Great Basin geothermal systems in this way," he said.

In addition, Faulds has developed and taught a geothermal exploration class, published many papers on his work and presented his work at many conferences, including the World Geothermal Congress in Bali, Indonesia and the GEONZ2010 Geoscience-Geothermal Conference in Auckland, New Zealand.

Faulds also presented information from his study at a session of the National Geothermal Academy at the University of Nevada, Reno.

"We want to help the industry achieve acceptable levels of site-selection risk ahead of expensive drilling," he said. "This study costs only $1 million, but it could cost a company several million dollars for drilling at a single prospect in the hopes that they hit a good hot well. Our research will provide the baseline studies that are absolutely needed if Nevada is going to become the Saudi Arabia of geothermal."

Source: Science Daily

 

Most people may think the speed of light is constant, but this is only the case in a vacuum, such as space, where it travels at 671million mph.

However, when it travels through different substances, such as water or solids, its speed is reduced, with different wavelengths (colours) travelling at different speeds.

The green laser is shown as it leaves the ruby crystal.

In addition, it has also been observed, but is not widely appreciated, that light can be dragged when it travels through a moving substance, such as glass, air or water – a phenomenon first predicted by Augustin-Jean Fresnel in 1818 and observed a hundred years later.

Prof. Miles Padgett in the Optics Group in the School of Physics & Astronomy, said: “The speed of light is a constant only in vacuum . When light travels through glass, movement of the glass drags the light with it too.

“Spinning a window as fast as you could is predicted to rotate the image of the world behind it ever so slightly. This rotation would be about a millionth of a degree and imperceptible to the human eye.”

In research detailed in the latest edition of the journal Science, researchers Dr Sonja Franke-Arnold, Dr Graham Gibson and Prof Padgett, in collaboration with their colleague Professor Robert Boyd at the Universities of Ottowa and Rochester, took a different approach and set up an experiment: shining a primitive image made up of the elliptical profile of a green laser through a ruby rod spinning on its axis at up to 3,000 rpm.

Once the light enters the ruby, its speed is slowed down to around the speed of sound (approximately 741mph) and the spinning motion of the rod drags the light with it, resulting in the image being rotated by almost five degrees: large enough to see with the naked eye.

Dr Franke-Arnold, who came up with the idea of using slow light in ruby to observe the photon drag, said: “We mainly wanted to demonstrate a fundamental optical principle, but this work has possible applications too.

“Images are information and the ability to store their intensity and phase is an important step to the optical storage and processing of quantum information, potentially achieving what no classical computer can ever match.

“The option to rotate an image by a set arbitrary angle presents a new way to code information, a possibility not accessed by any image coding protocol so far.”

Source: PhysOrg

 

Cei doi judecatori de la Inalta Curte din Londra responsabili de acest dosar au respins argumentele apararii potrivit carora cererea de extradare a australianului in varsta de 40 de ani este "injusta si contrara legii".

Julian Assange, suspectat in Suedia de viol si agresiune sexuala, a fost arestat in decembrie in Marea Britanie.

Julian Assange

O prima instanta britanica a aprobat, in februarie, extradarea lui Assange, insa avocatii acestuia au declansat o procedura complexa de apel.

Fondatorul WikiLeaks, consemnat la domiciliu in Marea Britanie in asteptarea deciziei judecatoresti, locuieste la conacul unui prieten, nu departe de Londra.

Site-ul WikiLeaks a inceput sa publice in noiembrie 2010 mii de telegrame diplomatice americane, site-ul si fondatorul sau atragand critici dure din partea administratiei de la Washington.

Într-o biografie neautorizata publicata in septembrie, Julian Assange dezminte inca o data acuzatiile de viol formulate in Suedia, denuntand o manipulare politica. "Aceste doua femei au avut cu mine relatii sexuale deplin consimtite", afirma el.

Sursa: bzi.ro

 
By Admin (from 02/11/2011 @ 11:01:58, in en - Global Observatory, read 531 times)

All'inizio, due anni fa, c'era solo Cagliari, poi si è aggiunto Calenzano in provincia di Firenze, seguito da Genova, Castelfranco Emilia (Mo), Civita Castellana, Napoli, Torino e, più recentemente,  Padova, Casalecchio di Reno (Bo), Castel del Piano in provincia di Grosseto. La lista dei comuni che ha istituito un registro del testamento biologico si allunga sempre più: ora se ne contano ottanta e hanno deciso di unirsi nella "Lega degli enti locali per il registro delle dichiarazioni anticipate di trattamento".

Detail-testamento-biologico1

L'Associazione Luca Coscioni, promotrice della campagna iniziata nel 2009 dopo la morte di Eluana Englaro, può ritenersi soddisfatta. La mappa dell'Italia, consultabile on-line, è affollata di bandierine verdi che indicano i piccoli o grandi centri dove è possibile depositare le proprie volontà sul fine vita. Tra questi manca proprio Lecco, paese natale di Eluana Englaro, che ha rimandato al mittente con 28 voti contrari, 7 favorevoli e 4 astenuti, la proposta dell'istituzione del registro per le volontà anticipate di trattamento.

Tra gli obiettivi della neonata associazione di comuni vi è quello di "tutelare il diritto all'autodeterminazione dei cittadini anche attraverso gli adeguati strumenti giudiziari e ad individuare i principi giuridici che permettono alle amministrazioni locali di intervenire, nonostante controversie interpretative anche da parte ministeriale".  Il documento della Lega dei comuni si riferisce a una circolare del 2010, firmata dai ministri della Salute Ferruccio Fazio, del Welfare Maurizio Sacconi e degli Interni Roberto Maroni, che liquidava l'iniziativa dei comuni come priva di "qualunque efficacia giuridica".

L'ANCI (Associazione Nazionale Comuni Italiani), da parte sua , ha sempre difeso il valore legale dei registri. Ma, in questo momento, la questione passa forse in secondo piano: la campagna dell'Associazione Luca Coscioni, così come le altre iniziative parallele (il videotestamento, la petizione al parlamento su testamento biologico ed eutanasia) serve innanzitutto per affermare il dissenso al DDL Calabrò che è in attesa di venire licenziato dal Senato, dopo gli emendamenti introdotti alla Camera il 12 luglio scorso.

Fonte: galileonet.it

 

The study, which appears in Science, reveals a unique pattern of brain activity when false memories are formed – one that hints at a surprising connection between our social selves and memory.

The experiment, conducted by Prof. Yadin Dudai and research student Micah Edelson of the Institute's Neurobiology Department with Prof. Raymond Dolan and Dr. Tali Sharot of University College London, took place in four stages. In the first, volunteers watched a documentary film in small groups. Three days later, they returned to the lab individually to take a memory test, answering questions about the film. They were also asked how confident they were in their answers.

They were later invited back to the lab to retake the test while being scanned in a functional MRI (fMRI) that revealed their brain activity. This time, the subjects were also given a "lifeline": the supposed answers of the others in their film viewing group (along with social-media-style photos). Planted among these were false answers to questions the volunteers had previously answered correctly and confidently. The participants conformed to the group on these "planted" responses, giving incorrect answers nearly 70% of the time.

 

But were they simply conforming to perceived social demands, or had their memory of the film actually undergone a change? To find out, the researchers invited the subjects back to the lab to take the memory test once again, telling them that the answers they had previously been fed were not those of their fellow film watchers, but random computer generations. Some of the responses reverted back to the original, correct ones, but close to half remained erroneous, implying that the subjects were relying on false memories implanted in the earlier session.

An analysis of the fMRI data showed differences in brain activity between the persistent false memories and the temporary errors of social compliance. The most outstanding feature of the false memories was a strong co-activation and connectivity between two brain areas: the hippocampus and the amygdala. The hippocampus is known to play a role in long-term memory formation, while the amygdala, sometimes known as the emotion center of the brain, plays a role in social interaction. The scientists think that the amygdala may act as a gateway connecting the social and memory processing parts of our brain; its "stamp" may be needed for some types of memories, giving them approval to be uploaded to the memory banks. Thus social reinforcement could act on the amygdala to persuade our brains to replace a strong memory with a false one.

Source: MedicalXpress

 

On Dec. 5, 2010, Cassini first detected the storm that has been raging ever since. It appears approximately 35 degrees north latitude of Saturn. Pictures from Cassini's imaging cameras show the storm wrapping around the entire planet covering approximately 2 billion square miles (4 billion square kilometers).

The storm is about 500 times larger than the biggest storm previously seen by Cassini during several months from 2009 to 2010. Scientists studied the sounds of the new storm's lightning strikes and analyzed images taken between December 2010 and February 2011. Data from Cassini's radio and plasma wave science instrument showed the lightning flash rate as much as 10 times more frequent than during other storms monitored since Cassini's arrival to Saturn in 2004. The data appear in a paper published this week in the journal Nature.

"Cassini shows us that Saturn is bipolar," said Andrew Ingersoll, an author of the study and a Cassini imaging team member at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif. "Saturn is not like Earth and Jupiter, where storms are fairly frequent. Weather on Saturn appears to hum along placidly for years and then erupt violently. I'm excited we saw weather so spectacular on our watch."

At its most intense, the storm generated more than 10 lightning flashes per second. Even with millisecond resolution, the spacecraft's radio and plasma wave instrument had difficulty separating individual signals during the most intense period. Scientists created a sound file from data obtained on March 15 at a slightly lower intensity period.

Cassini has detected 10 lightning storms on Saturn since the spacecraft entered the planet's orbit and its southern hemisphere was experiencing summer, with full solar illumination not shadowed by the rings. Those storms rolled through an area in the southern hemisphere dubbed "Storm Alley." But the sun's illumination on the hemispheres flipped around August 2009, when the northern hemisphere began experiencing spring.

"This storm is thrilling because it shows how shifting seasons and solar illumination can dramatically stir up the weather on Saturn," said Georg Fischer, the paper's lead author and a radio and plasma wave science team member at the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Graz. "We have been observing storms on Saturn for almost seven years, so tracking a storm so different from the others has put us at the edge of our seats."

The storm's results are the first activities of a new "Saturn Storm Watch" campaign. During this effort, Cassini looks at likely storm locations on Saturn in between its scheduled observations. On the same day that the radio and plasma wave instrument detected the first lightning, Cassini's cameras happened to be pointed at the right location as part of the campaign and captured an image of a small, bright cloud. Because analysis on that image was not completed immediately, Fischer sent out a notice to the worldwide amateur astronomy community to collect more images. A flood of amateur images helped scientists track the storm as it grew rapidly, wrapping around the planet by late January 2011.

The new details about this storm complement atmospheric disturbances described recently by scientists using Cassini's composite infrared spectrometer and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. The storm is the biggest observed by spacecraft orbiting or flying by Saturn. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured images in 1990 of an equally large storm.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena manages the mission for the agency's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The radio and plasma wave science team is based at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, where the instrument was built. The imaging team is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

Source: PhysOrg

 
By Admin (from 23/10/2011 @ 14:00:39, in en - Global Observatory, read 436 times)

A set of glasses packed with technology normally seen in smartphones and games consoles is the main draw at one of the featured stands at this year’s Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition.

Bionic glasses for poor vision

But the exhibit isn’t about the latest gadget must-have, it’s all about aiding those with poor vision and giving them greater independence.

‘We want to be able to enhance vision in those who’ve lost it or who have little left or almost none,’ explains Dr Stephen Hicks of the Department of Clinical Neurology at Oxford University. ‘The glasses should allow people to be more independent – finding their own directions and signposts, and spotting warning signals,’ he says.

Technology developed for mobile phones and computer gaming – such as video cameras, position detectors, face recognition and tracking software, and depth sensors – is now readily and cheaply available. So Oxford researchers have been looking at ways that this technology can be combined into a normal-looking pair of glasses to help those who might have just a small area of vision left, have cloudy or blurry vision, or can’t process detailed images.

The glasses should be appropriate for common types of visual impairment such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. NHS Choices estimates around 30% of people who are over 75 have early signs of age-related macular degeneration, and about 7% have more advanced forms.

‘The types of poor vision we are talking about are where you might be able to see your own hand moving in front of you, but you can’t define the fingers,’ explains Stephen.

The glasses have video cameras mounted at the corners to capture what the wearer is looking at, while a display of tiny lights embedded in the see-through lenses of the glasses feed back extra information about objects, people or obstacles in view.

In between, a smartphone-type computer running in your pocket recognises objects in the video image or tracks where a person is, driving the lights in the display in real time.

The extra information the glasses display about their surroundings should allow people to navigate round a room, pick out the most relevant things and locate objects placed nearby.

‘The glasses must look discrete, allow eye contact between people and present a simplified image to people with poor vision, to help them maintain independence in life,’ says Stephen. These guiding principles are important for coming up with an aid that is acceptable for people to wear in public, with eye contact being so important in social relationships, he explains.

The see-through display means other people can see you, while different light colours might allow different types of information to be fed back to the wearer, Stephen says. You could have different colours for people, or important objects, and brightness could tell you how near things were.

Stephen even suggests it may be possible for the technology to read back newspaper headlines. He says something called optical character recognition is coming on, so it possible to foresee a computer distinguishing headlines from a video image then have these read back to the wearer through earphones coming with the glasses. A whole stream of such ideas and uses are possible, he suggests. There are barcode readers in some mobile phones that download the prices of products; such barcode and price tag readers could also be useful additions to the glasses.

Stephen believes these hi-tech glasses can be realised for similar costs as smartphones – around £500. For comparison, a guide dog costs around £25-30,000 to train, he estimates.

He adds that people will have to get used to the extra information relayed on the glasses’ display, but that it might be similar to physiotherapy – the glasses will need to be tailored for individuals, their vision and their needs, and it will take a bit of time and practise to start seeing the benefits.

The exhibit at the Royal Society will take visitors through how the technology will work. ‘The primary aim is to simulate the experience of a visual prosthetic to give people an idea of what can be seen and how it might look,’ Stephen says.

A giant screen with video images of the exhibition floor itself will show people-tracking and depth perception at work. Another screen will invite visitors to see how good they are at navigating with this information. A small display added to the lenses of ski goggles should give people sufficient information to find their way round a set of tasks. An early prototype of a transparent LED array for the eventual glasses will also be on display.

All of this is very much at an early stage. The group is still assembling prototypes of their glasses. But as well as being one of the featured stands at the Royal Society’s exhibition, they have funding from the National Institute of Health Research to do a year-long feasibility study and plan to try out early systems with a few people in their own homes later this year.

Source: PhysOrg - Resarch provided by Oxford University

 

Although this scenario is still several decades away, researchers have been making significant progress in developing early types of biomolecular computers.

In a recent study published in Nano Letters, Computer Science Professor Ehud Shapiro and coauthors from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, have developed a biomolecular computer that can autonomously sense many different types of molecules simultaneously. In the future, this sensing ability could be integrated with a vast biomedical knowledge of diseases to enable computers to decide which drugs to release.

“We envision nanometer-sized computing devices (made of biomolecules) to roam our bodies in search of diseases in their early stage,” coauthor Binyamin Gil from the Weizmann Institute of Science told PhysOrg.com. “These devices would have the ability to sense disease indicators, diagnose the disease, and treat it by administering or activating a therapeutic biomolecule. They could be delivered to the bloodstream or operate inside cells of a specific organ or tissue and be given as a preventive care.”

A simple scheme of how a biomolecular computer works. Image credit: Gil, et al. ©2011 American Chemical Society

The development builds on the researchers’ previous demonstration of a biomolecular computer that consists of a two-state system made of biological components (DNA and a restriction enzyme). The computer, which operates in vitro, starts from the Yes state. In each computation step, the computer checks one disease indicator. If all of the indicators for the tested disease are present, the computation ends in the Yes state, namely it makes a positive diagnosis; if at least one disease indicator is not detected, it ends in the No state.

Previously, Shapiro's group showed that this biomolecular computer could detect disease indicators from mRNA expression levels and mutations. In the current study, the researchers have expanded the computer’s ability to also detect disease indicators from miRNAs, proteins, and small molecules such as ATP. At the same time, the computer’s detection method is simpler than before, requiring fewer components and fewer interactions with the disease indicators.

As the researchers explain, sensing a combination of several disease indicators is much more useful than sensing just one, since it allows for better accuracy and greater sensitivity to differences between diseases. For example, they note that in the case of thyroid cancer, the presence of the protein thyroglobulin and the hormone calcitonin can enable a much more reliable diagnosis than if only one of these disease indicators was detected.

Although the ability to detect several disease indicators marks an important step toward in vivo biomolecular computers and programmable drugs, there are still many obstacles that researchers must overcome in the process.

“The biggest challenge is operating such devices in living surrounding like the blood stream or cell's cytoplasm,” Gil said. “Currently we are developing devices that rely on simpler machinery (e.g. no restriction enzyme) or on the cell's own machinery.”

Source: PhysOrg

 

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Stai linistit ca multinationalele farmaceutice producatori de citostatice exorbitant de scumpe, or sa lupte mereu impotriva legalizarii canabisului in scopuri terapeutice ........
14/08/2014 @ 21:16:00
By Petre Gulie
La cannabis e',la medicina
09/08/2014 @ 20:39:16
By Stefano Ferrari
right on!!
12/07/2014 @ 20:07:45
By Brian Barton
Cannabis is the best medicine in nature. Best everything. But shit, thc is important to!
10/07/2014 @ 13:26:01
By Jason Bond
Keys
06/07/2014 @ 02:59:37
By Altan
Thanks I was just looking for a recipe - gotta love the way the Spirit moves
04/07/2014 @ 19:06:54
By Ginamarie Pezzi
unfortunately that is a reality these days - we humans - especially in the west - only want to hear "a" truth that fits our own limited perspective rather than one that is open & is truth in many ...
04/07/2014 @ 18:57:31
By Ginamarie Pezzi


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