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A lack of training may be why most doctors still hesitate to recommend medical marijuana, according to a recent study out of Colorado.
By Admins (from 16/04/2014 @ 05:03:24, in en - Global Observatory, read 1767 times)

The study was conducted by Alfred Reid, MA and Elin Kondrad, MD of St. Anthony North Family Medicine Residency and included survey responses from over 500 members of the Colorado Academy of Family Physicians.

Published in the Journal of The American Board of Family Medicine, the results suggest that only a minority of doctors in Colorado support medical marijuana, but a large majority believe more training should be offered.

"Respondents to our survey demonstrate a strong desire for educational opportunities about medical marijuana at all levels of medical education."

Of the 520 family physicians that responded, only 19% agreed that medical marijuana should be recommended.

On the other hand, 80% agreed that medical marijuana education should be taught at medical schools. 82% also agreed that medical marijuana education should be part of family practice residency and 92% thought continuing medical education about medical marijuana should be available.

Interestingly, opinions on marijuana's schedule 1 classification were relatively split, with 37% in support of its classification and 44% in disagreement. As a schedule 1 substance, federal law classifies marijuana as having no recognized medical use and hinders research from being conducted.

But despite the caution expressed by most doctors, medical marijuana is widespread in Colorado. An estimated 163,856 patients or 2% of the entire state population are legally authorized to use medical marijuana.

Source: LeafScience